A real dish of a museum: The Toguri Museum of Art

Nabeshima ware dish with repeated peach motif. Edo period,late 17th c. to early 18th c. Image courtesy of Toguri Museum of Art. Nabeshima ware dish with repeated peach motif. Edo period,late 17th c. to early 18th c. Image courtesy of Toguri Museum of Art.

THERE ARE OVER 600 ART MUSEUMS IN JAPAN, most of which we never hear about in English. This is a shame as there are real treasures out there waiting to be found. I’d like to steer you in the direction of The Toguri Museum of Art, a museum dedicated to beautiful Japanese porcelain. It’s only 15 minutes on foot from Shibuya Station, a little beyond Bunkamura.

I’ve dished up a full report in the latest issue of Artscape Japan. While you’re there, consider signing up for Artscape’s monthly mail for notice of each update. It’s free and a great way to learn about art in Japan.

Imari ware plate in Ko-kutani style with peony and butterfly. Edo period, mid-17th c. Image courtesy of Toguri Museum of Art.

Imari ware plate in Ko-kutani style with peony and butterfly. Edo period, mid-17th c. Image courtesy of Toguri Museum of Art.

Nabeshima ware dish with dandelion design. Edo period, late 17th c. to early 18th c. Image courtesy of Toguri Museum of Art.

Nabeshima ware dish with dandelion design. Edo period, late 17th c. to early 18th c. Image courtesy of Toguri Museum of Art.

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One Response to A real dish of a museum: The Toguri Museum of Art

  1. Anthony says:

    My two favourite museums are in Kurashiki. The Ohara art museum has a fantastic collection of European art. The other is the toy museum (located near the canal). It is a fantastic museum filled with old toys, mostly handmade dating back many years. One of the exhibits compares the toys with the postage stamp series of toys. It doesn’t get nearly enough traffic, but that could be due to the entrance fee.

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