Getting to Mt. Oyama for Less: How to Purchase the Tanzawa-Oyama Free Pass

Anyone who knows me knows I send a lot of visitors to Mt. Oyama, once one of the most popular pilgrimage sites in Japan and still a great destination for hiking and gourmet tofu lunches. The mountain’s proximity to Tokyo and Yokohama makes it perfect for daytrips, and transportation is easy and affordable. Isehara station (on the Odakyu Odawara line) is the gateway. Express trains depart frequently from Shinjuku station, making the trip to Isehara in about 60 minutes.

This post will save you some yen and hassle by making it easy to purchase the Tanzawa-Oyama Free Pass, which is good for two-days and bundles the various forms of public transportation into one convenient, money-saving ticket. There are two types: Ticket A, which includes round-trip transportation on the cable car, and Ticket B, which is cheaper because it doesn’t. If you’re going up the mountain and don’t want to hike all the way, get Ticket A. If you’re coming just to see Noh Oct. 5-6, 2021, and don’t have time for sightseeing, get Ticket B.

You have two options: you can buy the pass at an Odakyu Sightseeing Service Center, like the one in Shinjuku Station pictured below, or at any ticket window at any station along the Odakyu Odawara Line. You can do this in advance, if you want, but you will have to specify the station you’ll be departing from and returning to (Shinjuku, Yoyogi Uehara, Ebina, etc.) and the first day you want to use it.

Option 2 is to purchase the Tanzawa-Oyama Free Pass from a ticket machine. Here’s a step-by-step explanation, with photos, to help you do that. Note: the travel period for passes you buy from machines begin on the day of purchase, so you can’t buy a pass in advance from a machine.

To start, find a machine. You want one that includes the word フリーパス (free pass) along the top. Fortunately, that’s most of the machines.

Select English. You’ll get this screen next. Select ODAKYU Line (top left with blue stripe).

At the next screen, select FREE PASS (the icon with the trees at the top right).

More buttons to push! This time, select the green button that says “Tanzawa-Oyama.”

Now choose which type you want: with the cable-car or without. If you want to ride the cable-car, choose (A). If you don’t need the cable-car, choose (B). Note: I was buying in Odawara (yes, you can travel from that direction too) so my fare options will be different from what you’ll see. It’s pro-rated by distance so the closer you are to Isehara/Oyama, the cheaper the pass.

Then you’ll get the payment screen. So go ahead and insert your money. Remember, your total depends on where you’re buying and may be different from mine.

And voila — you’re done! Your ticket will look like this. It goes through the automatic ticket gates at the stations. On the buses, just show it to the driver as you exit. If you ride the cable car, the attendant will take it and clip it. Hang on to the ticket until you arrive back at your home station.

Getting from Isehara Station to Mt. Oyama

Upon arrival, hit the bathrooms at the top of the stairs as you come up from the platform. The bathrooms inside the gate are cleaner and nicer than what you’ll find after you exit the station. When you’re ready to exit the station, slip your pass into the gate and don’t forget to take it with you. Turn right out of the ticket gate (there’s only one) and follow the signs for the North Exit and the stairs to the bus stop. There is a tourist information office halfway down the stairs that provides free maps and brochures in English and other foreign languages. At the bottom of the stairs, walk straight ahead to the bus stops, which are just beyond the public toilet.

At bus stop #4, board any bus bound for the cable car station, marked 伊10, 11 or 12. You board from the back. No need to take the little paper slip from the automatic machine at the door — you’ve got the Tanzawa-Oyama Free Pass! Buses run about twice an hour on weekdays and more frequently on weekends. Check with your usual online routing service but as of this writing (Sept. 2021) the schedule looks like this:

If you’re coming to see outdoor Noh (Oct. 5-6, 2021) get off the bus at the Shamukyoku-iriguchi 社務局入口 bus stop (18 minutes from the station). After the bus pulls away, cross the street to the red bridge over the river and walk straight for 1-2 minutes to reach the shrine administration building (that’s the Shamukyoku) and the Noh stage. Follow instructions from the people offering direction and let them know you’re looking for the international sign-in desk (インバウンド受付).

If you’re going up Mt. Oyama, whether hiking or taking the cable car, ride the bus from the station for about 25-30 minutes to the last stop. From there, head up hill to the Koma Sando shopping street, stairs lined with restaurants, craft shops and pickle stands. At the top of the stairs you have a choice: start your hike on the trails that begin there, or ride the cable-car to Oyama Afuri Shrine. From there, you can access additional trails, including the path to the summit, or simply visit the shrine and enjoy the view. Don’t miss the passageway under the shrine, to the left of the counter where amulets are sold. Inside, you can fill your water bottle with sacred water from a dragon spout and view artifacts associated with the shrine. This level of the mountain also offers traditional refreshment stands and a stylish café with outdoor seating that serves beverages and light meals. (Teahouse Sekison, Tel (0463) 94-3628; closes at 4 pm).

Hint for those who seek extra comfort: Some of the super-express “Romance Car” trains now stop at Isehara, allowing you to travel in a reserved seat, without changes, in as little as 47 minutes. The schedule is convenient for hikers, with two or more trains in the morning, depending on the day of the week, and two in the afternoon for the return trip to Tokyo. (More on weekends and holidays.)

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Ticket Giveaway: Noh and Kyogen Outdoors on Mt. Oyama

5 (Photo by Meguro Kunihiko)
Photo by Meguro Kunihiko

(Update Sept. 2: All seats have been taken for both nights but I’ve started wait-lists — links below, one for each of the two nights. I’ve added information on the Kyogen and more information on special education opportunities.)

Join me at special performances of Noh and Kyogen at the Oyama Afuri Shrine on Mt. Oyama in Kanagawa Prefecture. On Oct. 5 (sold out; wait list open) and Oct. 6 (just two spaces left), when top actors from the Kanze School of Noh and the Okura School of Kyogen— including Living National Treasures — will share their art outdoors, as Noh was originally performed. There will be an English guidebook as well as explanation in English and Japanese provided via an app to your phone or i-Pad (free loaner tablets available), making this an excellent opportunity both for those who are new to Noh and seasoned viewers who would like to deepen their appreciation. This year, there will be a special exhibition of Noh masks and costumes next to the stage.

Thanks to a grant from the Agency for Cultural Affairs, I have a limited number of free tickets to offer to foreign residents of Japan. If you’d like to come with a Japanese friend or partner, I can secure a reservation for them at a discount (4,000 yen reduced to 3,000 yen). For full information on the program, including transportation and how to sign up, see below.

A note on Covid-19: The venue is outdoors, with plenty of natural ventilation, but for everyone’s safety, the numbers of spectators has been reduced by half and masks will be required. Even if Kanagawa extends the State of Emergency, in its current form, into October, the program will be allowed to go ahead. If stricter restrictions are requested, it is possible that spectators will regretfully not be allowed. If that happens, we will notify you immediately by email.

Stage 3 Meguro Kunihiko
Noh outdoors at Oyama. Photo by Meguro Kunihiko.

Program: Tuesday Oct. 5, 4:30 to 7:00 pm

3:30 Venue opens. Prof. Keizō Miyamoto of the Center for International and Interdisciplinary Research on Noh Theatre, will give a 20-minute lecture on Noh masks and costumes in the exhibition space. Lecture is in Japanese but a handout in English will provided for foreign visitors who understand some Japanese but can benefit from some comprehension assistance.

4:00 Richard Emmett, a Noh performer and professor at Musashino University, will provide explanation in English about Noh and the evening’s program exclusively for our group.

4:30 Program begins:

HITORI OKINA

A sacred rite in which the actors perform divine figures who dance for peace, prosperity, and safety across the land. Performed by Yamashina Yaemon, a Living National Treasure.

AFURI SHRINE KAGURA DANCE

A Shinto ritual dance for the gods performed by shrine maidens.

KYOGEN: HAGI DAIMYO (The Bush Clover Lord) Comical theater performed by Yamamoto Tōjirō, a Living National Treasure.

NOH PLAY: TAKASAGO 高砂 Lead roles played by Kanze Kiyokazu, the 26th hereditary head of the Kanze School of Noh, and his son, Kanze Saburōta.

This play was written by the great playwright Zeami, and is representative of the auspicious plays that revolve around a deity blessing the world — goodness knows, we need that now! The dignity of the pine tree is compared to the flourishing state of poetry, which in turn is a symbol of peaceful times. The highlight of the first half of the play is a scene where an old couple make this comparison, while sweeping pine needles and purifying the land under the tree. In the second half, look for the dignified dance of the deity Sumiyoshi Myōjin. While this deity is usually depicted as an old man, here he appears in the form of a young and vigorous man. Among the dances in Noh, this one is exceptionally energetic. Towards the end of the play the movements, corresponding to the libretto, are particularly grand and expressive. If you’ve ever been to a traditional Japanese wedding, you may have heard auspicious songs, called shūgen-utai, borrowed from this play, Takasago.

Full synopsis and story paper here.

This program on Tues. Oct. 5 is now full. To get on the wait-list, please sign up HERE:

Program: Wednesday Oct. 3, 4:30 to 7:00 pm

HITORI OKINA

A sacred rite in which the actors perform divine figures who dance for peace, prosperity, and safety across the land. Performed by Kanze Yoshinobu.

AFURI SHRINE KAGURA DANCE

A Shinto ritual dance for the gods performed by shrine maidens.

KYOGEN: FUMIYAMADACHI (The Poetic Bandits) Two bandits get into a quarrel while trying to ambush a passerby. Comical theater performed by Yamamoto Noritoshi.

NOH PLAY: KURAMA TENGU (The Goblin of Kurama). The lead role, is performed by Yamashina Yaemon, a Living National Treasure.

Full synopsis and story paper here.

This program is now full. To get on the wait list, please sign up HERE.

Transportation: The closest station is Isehara on the Odawara Odakyu Line, about one hour from Shinjuku station by regular express trains (590 yen).  From the North Exit of Isehara Station, board a bus at bus stop #4 bound for Oyama Cable Car and alight at Shamukyoku- Iriguchi (社務局入口).  The Noh stage is about 2 minutes walk from the bus stop. There will be extra buses back to Isehara station after the performance. Fare is 310 yen, IC cards OK. You can save a little by purchasing the Tanzawa-Oyama Free Pass at any Odakyu station. It costs 1,580 yen (for Type A, without the cable car, which you don’t need unless you come early and wish to take a trip up the mountain to hike, enjoy the view or pay a visit to the main building of Oyama Afuri Shrine and/or Oyama Temple.) There will be extra buses going back to Isehara after the program. There is free parking at the venue for those who wish to drive.

Link to Google Maps: Oyama Afuri Shrine Noh Stage

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View now: “Horimono: Japan’s Tattoo Pilgrimage”

Catching up with some news, I’m happy to announce that the short documentary I made with David Caprara and Kira Dane was picked up by Vice News for worldwide distribution. I hope you’ll watch it — it’s only 17 minutes. As I post this, it’s already been viewed a quarter-of-a-million times by people all over the world.

The film, which challenges Japanese stereotypes concerning tattoos, was made possible through a crowdfunding campaign that attracted over two hundred investors from around the world. As you’ve probably heard, tattoos are highly stigmatized in Japan — you can’t enter many beaches, gyms or hot-spring baths if you have one, and many employers won’t knowingly hire anyone with a tattoo. This is because people in Japan associate tattoos with the yakuza, Japan’s feared but waning criminal underworld. But the perceived connection is something much more recent than most people realize, a faulty image concocted largely by Japan’s movie industry. Most Japanese are unaware that the full-body tattoos known as “horimono” can actually be traced back to the same flourishing urban culture that brought us ukiyo-e woodblock prints and grand-scale kabuki theater. In our film, we follow a group of tattooed individuals on their annual pilgrimage to a sacred mountain shrine, a traditional that has continued for more than 120 years.

This project was an outgrowth of my previous work with the people of Mt. Oyama, where the shrine — Oyama Afuri Jinya —is located. Oyama was once one of the most popular pilgrimages in Japan, every summer attracting great throngs of pilgrims during the short pilgrimage season, which lasted for just three weeks in July. At a time when the population of Edo (present-day Tokyo) was said to be one-million people, 200,000 pilgrims would travel together on foot to Mt. Oyama, which is located about 50 kilometers west of the capital in what is now Kanagawa Prefecture.

I’ve written a light tourism piece about Mt. Oyama for Metropolis Magazine and a more scholarly, in-depth article for the Toshiba Foundation’s Japan Insights website, along with posts for their blog about an amazing fire ritual at one temple on Oyama and the important Buddhist statuary in another.

David, Kira and I also produced an written interview and a short video with a modern-day tattooist who sticks to the traditional tebori (hand-poked) methods. I have upcoming speaking engagements in February, both online and in person, about the Oyama pilgrimage, Japanese tattoos and the rise of the modern misperceptions.

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Online Gallery Tour, Early Japanese Photography (now available on demand)

Tokyo Station under construction (1911), by Miyauchi Kōtarō, collection of Yokosuka City Museum

Update Dec. 21: The online guided tour I gave on Dec 18 is now available for viewing any time. It introduces an exhibition on early Japanese photography at the Tokyo Photographic Art Museum through Jan. 24, “History of Early Japanese Photography: Kantō Region, Images of Japan 1853-1912.”

Watch it here, on the museum’s YouTube channel.

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Event notice: tea ceremony, Sat. Dec. 7

interior

The “Kōka” teahouse in the garden of the Tokyo Metropolitan Teien Art Museum, an Important Cultural Property

UPDATE NOV. 13: THIS PROGRAM IS NOW FULL.

Experience an authentic tea ceremony with English explanation in a historic teahouse within a beautiful Japanese garden. Saturday Dec. 7, 2019 at 11:30 am. Hosted by the Mushakōji Senke School of Tea at the Tokyo Metropolitan Teien Art Museum, guided/interpreted by me.  Sign ups (in English) on the museum’s English-language sign-up page.

Location: “Kōka” Teahouse, in the garden of the Tokyo Metropolitan Teien Art Museum

Host: a tea master from the Chōsō group of the Mushakōji Senke School of Tea, one of the three historical households directly descended from the 16th century tea master Sen no Rikyū.

teien.jpg

The garden is beautiful in all seasons. It was recently restored, after a closure of several years.

Capacity:  20  (reservations will be closed as soon as a session reaches capacity). This will fill up quickly so if you’d like to attend, please don’t delay in signing up.

Fee: 1,000 yen per person for one session (includes a serving of “usucha” tea and a traditional sweet). You will also need to purchase regular museum admission (1000 yen), which gives you access to the museum, the current exhibition. You’ll be able to see the beautiful Art Deco house that is the museum’s main building and the current exhibition of Japanese and Asian ceramics, painting, lacquerware and basketry.  Or you can buy just the  garden-only admission (200 yen).

teaceremony

Picture from an earlier tea ceremony event with English.  There is time to admire the utensils and ask questions, and photography is ok (before and after the ceremony).

 

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Event notice: outdoor Noh Oct. 2 & 3

5 (Photo by Meguro Kunihiko)

Photo by Meguro Kunihiko

Join me at special performances of Noh and Kyogen at the Oyama Afuri Shrine on Mt. Oyama in Kanagawa Prefecture. On Oct. 2 and 3, 2019, top actors from the Kanze School of Noh — including Living National Treasures — will share their art outdoors, as Noh was originally performed. There will be an English guidebook and earphone commentary in English, making this an excellent opportunity both for those who are new to Noh and seasoned viewers who would like to deepen their appreciation.

Stage 3 Meguro Kunihiko

Noh outdoors at Oyama. Photo by Meguro Kunihiko.

Program: Wednesday Oct. 2

HITORI OKINA

A sacred rite in which the actors perform divine figures who dance for peace, prosperity, and safety across the land. Performed by Yamashina Yaemon, a Living National Treasure.

AFURI SHRINE KAGURA DANCE

A Shinto ritual dance for the gods performed by shrine maidens.

KYOGEN: HI-NO-SAKE (“The Liquor Pipe”)

Comical theater performed by Yamamoto Tojiro, a Living National Treasure.

NOH: TSUCHIGUMO (“The Ground Spider”)

The lead roles are played by Kanze Kiyokazu, the 26th generational hereditary head of the Kanze School of Noh.

Synopsis: In the first scene, a mysterious monk appears in front of the military commander Minamoto no Raiko, who is feeling ill. The monk hints that he is not what he appears and spins out threads, revealing that he is in fact a spider-like monster known as tsuchigumo. Raiko pulls out a sword by his pillow and attacks but the monk/monster disappears. In the second scene, Raiko’s retainers are assembled at Mt. Katsuragi, intending to hunt down the monster that has threatened their leader. A huge spider emerges from a mound in the ground and attacks again and again with spider threads. A fierce battles ensues but in the end the spider is slayed.

To reserve a seat for this performance with a 500 yen discount and including program and earphone rental (3,500 yen, payment at the door) sign up HERE:

Program: Thursday Oct. 3

HITORI OKINA

A sacred rite in which the actors perform divine figures who dance for peace, prosperity, and safety across the land. Performed by Kanze Yoshinobu.

AFURI SHRINE KAGURA DANCE

A Shinto ritual dance for the gods performed by shrine maidens.

KYOGEN: NEONGYOKU (“Singing in One’s Sleep”)

Comical theater performed by Yamamoto Noritoshi.

NOH: MOMIJIGARI (“Viewing Autumn Leaves”)

The shite, or lead role, is performed by Yamashina Yaemon, a Living National Treasure.

Synopsis: In the first scene, a beautiful lady of seemingly high rank is on an excursion to Togakushi-yama with a retinue of female attendants to see the fall colors. While they are enjoying a banquet, a warrior of the Taira clan who has been out deer-hunting approaches. He is Taira no Koremochi, played by the waki or secondary actor. Rather than disturb the party by riding past, he dismounts, intending to continue on his way. But the lady invites him to drink with her. Koremochi becomes intoxicated as the lady presses drinks upon him. Her dance increases in tempo. When he finally falls asleep, she leaves him in the forest, saying he should never wake from his dream.  In the second scene, a deity appears to Koremochi and reveals that the lady is a demon. The deity presents Koremochi with a divine sword and tells him to kill the demon. The lady returns, transformed into a fire-breathing demon.  After a pitched battle, Koremochi slays the demon with the sword.

To reserve a seat for this performance with a 500 yen discount including program and earphone rental (3,500 yen, payment at the door) sign up HERE:

Transportation: The closest station is Isehara on the Odawara Odakyu Line, about one hour from Shinjuku station by regular express trains (590 yen).  From the North Exit of Isehara Station, board a bus at bus stop #4 bound for Oyama Cable Car and alight at Shamukyoku- Iriguchi (社務局入口).  Fare is 310 yen, IC cards OK. The Noh stage is about 5 minutes walk from the bus stop. There will be extra buses back to Isehara station after the performance.

Link to Google Maps: Oyama Afuri Shrine Noh Stage

 

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Please help me tell this story: tattoo pilgrimage

Those of you who read my articles or follow my tours know I know how to tell a story about Japan. Now I need YOUR help to tell this story, about a tattooed group who have been making a pilgrimage to a holy mountain every year for well over a hundred years. Together, we can challenge stereotypes and tell an untold story about tattoos and pilgrimage in Japanese culture. I’ve been bringing small groups of foreign visitors to the mountain since 2015. You may have joined me to see Noh performed there by firelight.  If so, you know what a special place Oyama is.

This summer, my crew and I plan to follow a very special group of individuals as they carry on the long tradition of the Oyama pilgrimage. We have full local support and have gained unprecedented access to film inside the ancient Shinto shrine there. The only thing we still need is funds for production. Please take a look at our Kickstarter crowdfunding page — the photos alone are worth the click, believe me! Watch the trailer we’ve prepared.  And if you can, please make a pledge and support us on our journey.

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Event notice: tea ceremony, Sat. March 30

interior

The “Kōka” teahouse in the garden of the Tokyo Metropolitan Teien Art Museum, an Important Cultural Property

Experience an authentic tea ceremony with English explanation in a historic teahouse within a beautiful Japanese garden. Saturday March 30, 2019 at 1:00 pm. Hosted by the Mushakōji Senke School of Tea at the Tokyo Metropolitan Teien Art Museum, guided/interpreted by me.  Sign ups (in English) will begin Monday March 4, 2019 from 10 am on the museum’s English-language website.  Look for the notice it in the “programs” section.  (It’s not up yet as I write this so I can’t provide an exact link.)

Location: “Kōka” Teahouse, in the garden of the Tokyo Metropolitan Teien Art Museum

Host: a tea master from the Chōsō group of the Mushakōji Senke School of Tea, one of the three historical households directly descended from the 16th century tea master Sen no Rikyū.

teien.jpg

The garden is beautiful in all seasons. It was recently restored, after a closure of several years.

Capacity:  20  (reservations will be closed as soon as a session reaches capacity). This will fill up quickly so if you’d like to attend, please don’t delay in signing up.

Fee: 1,000 yen per person for one session (includes a serving of “usucha” tea and a traditional sweet). You will also need to purchase regular museum admission (900 yen), which gives you access to the museum, the current exhibition and the gardens. You’ll be able to see the beautiful Art Deco house that is the museum’s main building and the current exhibition of surreal photo collages by Okanoue Toshiko.  Or you can buy just the  garden-only admission (200 yen).

teaceremony

Picture from an earlier tea ceremony event with English.  There is time to admire the utensils and ask questions, and photography is ok (before and after the ceremony).

 

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Tea ceremony for everyone! Workshops with English interpretation, Sat. Nov. 17

interior

The “Kōka” teahouse, an Important Cultural Property, is beautifully situated within the garden of the Tokyo Metropolitan Teien Art Museum.

Tea ceremony made approachable! Learn about the history and aesthetics of the Japanese tea ceremony, and how you can bring the tea ceremony into your own life. right now, without lessons or a teahouse or all the special utensils.  At the same time you can experience an authentic tea ceremony in a historic teahouse within a beautiful Japanese garden, just as the fall colors are beginning to turn.  Details and sign ups here on the museum website.

Location: “Kōka” Teahouse, in the garden of the Tokyo Metropolitan Teien Art Museum

Hosts: tea masters from the Urasenke School of Tea, one of the three historical households directly descended from the 16th century tea master Sen no Rikyū. They are “the real deal” but their focus is on making tea ceremony something anyone can do. I’ll be there to provide English interpretation.

teien.jpg

The garden is beautiful in all seasons. It was recently restored, after a closure of several years.

Capacity:  15 people per session, for 2 sessions (one in the morning, one in the afternoon) for a total of 30 lucky folks.  (Reservations will be closed as soon as a session reaches capacity). Based on past experience, I expect both to fill up quickly so if you’d like to attend please don’t delay in signing up.)

Fee: 3,000 yen per person (includes a serving of “usucha” tea and a traditional sweet, and a beautiful tea whisk handmade in Kyoto to take with you so you can enjoy matcha tea at home. You will also need to purchase either garden admission (200 yen) or regular museum admission (1,200 yen), which gives you access to the museum, the current exhibition and the gardens. You’ll be able to see all the splendor that is the former Prince Asaka Residence as well as the current exhibition about exoticism in Art Deco.

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I attended a version of this workshop  in October so I’d be able to interpret.  I really enjoyed it and thought it worthwhile. It gave me ideas about how I can bring tea-ceremony aesthetics into my own life, at home.

Ebisawa

The mood is casual. Photography is allowed and questions encouraged. You don’t have to sit on your knees — everyone is invited to sit cross-legged or with their legs to the side, and to stand up and stretch if needed.

Now that it’s been de-mystified, you can be sure I’ll be whisking up my own matcha at home now. Everyone gets a tea whisk, handmade in Kyoto, to take home.

teawhisks.jpg

I am happy to have a tea whisk of my very own. Now that it’s all been de-mystified, you can be sure I’ll be whisking up my own matcha at home now.

 

 

 

 

 

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NEW! Museum Tour in English: Botanical themes in Imari Ware at the Toguri Museum of Art

mum_plates

Chrysanthemum-shaped dishes, decorated with octopus arabesque and poem design in underglaze blue. Imari ware. Edo period. 19th century.

On Monday Sept. 10, from 10 to 11:30 am, I will give a special tour in English at the Toguri Museum of Art, which is located near Shibuya Station in Tokyo.  I’ll be guiding the group  through the current exhibition of flower and plant themes in Imari ware, giving special focus to the auspicious meanings behind these traditional motifs.  Life in Japan is so much more fun when you understand the hidden messages in designs! Once you know to look for them, you’ll see them again and again in your daily life.

bottle

Bottle, decorated with wisteria design in overglaze enamels. Imari ware. Edo period. Mid-17th century.

If you’ve been on my museum tours before, you know they are lively and informal. I try to keep keep things accessible for total beginners while offering new information and insights for those who may be already deep into the subject matter.  This is a completely private event, so we’ll have the museum all to ourselves. Plenty of opportunity to ask questions and explore the exhibition.

The cost of 3,000 yen per person includes museum admission, the guided tour, a mini-lecture by the curator (interpreted into English by me) PLUS a pair of tickets for free admission for two on your next visit (a 2,000 yen value), so you can bring a friend or family member to share what you learned. Or save it for the next exhibition, which opens on Oct. 5. As part of this event, we’ll also have a chance to see one special work that is not normally on display, and while photography is normally not allowed in the museum, our group will have special permission to take pictures. You are welcome to  make photographs for future reference or to post on social media.

Number of people:  30  (reservations will be closed as soon as we reach capacity). Based on past experience, this will fill up quickly so if you’d like to attend, please don’t delay in signing up. This is the only event in English that will be held at this museum this year.  All in all, this is a wonderful opportunity the museum is affording us, and a nice way to learn more about Japan and Japanese antique dishes.  And everyone loves plants and flowers, right?

You can sign up right here, on the form below.

 

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