(UPDATE: NOW FULL) Event notice: tea ceremony, Sat. March 24

interior

The “Kōka” teahouse in the garden of the Tokyo Metropolitan Teien Art Museum, an Important Cultural Property

UPDATE 3/8 11:30 am: THIS EVENT IS NOW FULL! Experience an authentic tea ceremony with English explanation in a historic teahouse within a beautiful Japanese garden. Saturday March 24 at 1:00 pm. Hosted by the Mushakōji Senke School of Tea, interpreted by me.  Sign ups here on the museum website.

Location: “Kōka” Teahouse, in the garden of the Tokyo Metropolitan Teien Art Museum

Host: a tea master from the Chōsō group of the Mushakōji Senke School of Tea, one of the three historical households directly descended from the 16th century tea master Sen no Rikyū.

teien.jpg

The garden is beautiful in all seasons. It was recently restored, after a closure of several years.

Capacity:  20  (reservations will be closed as soon as a session reaches capacity). This will fill up quickly so if you’d like to attend, please don’t delay in signing up.

Fee: 1,000 yen per person for one session (includes a serving of “usucha” tea and a traditional sweet. You will also need to purchase regular museum admission, which gives you access to the museum, the current exhibition and the gardens. You’ll be able to see two exhibitions, one on French children’s books and the other on Art Deco.

teaceremony

A similar event offered last December. It was the first time the museum sponsored a tea ceremony in its historic teahouse, and the first time to offer such an event with English.

 

 

 

Advertisements
Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Museum tour in English: Yokoyama Taikan at the Yamatane Museum of Art (Feb. 9)

037 A0119 横山大観 心神_R800dpi

Yokoyama Taikan Divine Spirit: Mt. Fuji (1952), Yamatane Museum of Art

Update, Feb. 5: due to cancellations, we have space for just a few people.  I will give a tour at  the Yamatane Museum of Art in Tokyo on Friday Feb. 9 at 10:30 am, guiding visitors through the  exhibition Yokoyama Taikan — The Elite of the Tokyo Art World. The tour is by reservation only, will last about an hour and is free with regular museum admission (1,000 yen for adults).

 

030 A0807 横山大観 春朝_R800dpi

Yokoyama Taikan, Spring Morning (c. 1939), Yamatane Museum of Art

This is a wonderful opportunity to learn more about Japan through top-class works of art.  Yokoyama Taikan (1868-1958) was one of the most influential Japanese painters of the 20th century, known particularly for his many stunning images of Mt. Fuji. To mark the 150th anniversary of his birth,the museum is putting their entire collection of Taikan paintings on view, a total of 40 works acquired by the museum’s founder over the course of a long friendship with the artist. This is the first time in the museum’s history that all their Taikan holdings will be displayed at once.

009 A0049 横山大観 木兎_R800dpi

Yokoyama Taikan, Horned Owl (1926), Yamatane Museum of Art

We’ll also see works by others who worked closely with Taikan to forge new directions in Nihonga (Japanese-style painting), including Hishida Shunsō (1874-1911) and  Shimomura Kanzan (1973-1930), as well as other painters among the Tokyo art elite, such as Kobayashi Kokei  (1883–1957) and Higashiyama Kaii (1908-1999).

049 A0005 小林古径 牛_R800dpi

Kobayashi Kokei, Oxen (1943), Yamatane Museum of Art

If you’ve been on my museum tours before, you know they are lively and informal. I try to keep keep things accessible for total beginners while offering new information and insights for those who may be already deep into the subject matter. The tour is during regular museum hours, so we’ll be using headsets connected wirelessly to my microphone. This should allow everyone to hear well without our talk disturbing other visitors.

057 A0754 東山魁夷 年暮る_R800dpi

Higashiyama Kaii, End of the Year (1968), Yamatane Museum of Art

This tour is limited to 25 people (the number of headsets available). I expect this to fill up quickly, so please do sign up here:

The Yamatane Museum of Art is located at 3-12-36 Hiroo, Shibuya-ku, and is about a 10 minute walk from Ebisu Station (use the West Exit if you’re coming on JR; Exit 2 if you’re coming on the Hibiya subway line). There is a map and directions on the museum’s website or use this link to Google Maps.

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Museum tour in English: paintings of beautiful women at the Yamatane Museum of Art (Sept. 22)

001 A0348 上村松園 蛍

Uemura Shōen, Firefly, Color on Silk, Taishō Period, 1913, Yamatane Museum of Art

(UPDATE: THIS TOUR IS NOW FULL.) Please join me at the Yamatane Museum of Art in Tokyo on Friday Sept. 22 at 10:30 am, when I’ll give a guided tour in English of the exhibition, Uemura Shōen and Quintessential Binjinga, Paintings of Beautiful Women. The tour is by reservation only, will last about an hour and is free with regular museum admission (1,000 yen for adults).

This is a wonderful opportunity to learn more about Japan through top-class works of art. One highlight will be the the chance to see the museum’s full collection of  paintings by Uemura Shōen (1875-1949), the first female artist to be awarded the Order of Culture and one of just two women who served as official artist to the Imperial Household. Numbering 18 works in total — all of which will be on display — the Yamatane’s collection of Shōen paintings is one of the best in Japan. We’ll also see paintings of beautiful women by many other artists, including Hishida Shunsō (1874-1911), Itō Shinsui (1898-1972), Kataoka Tamako (1905-2008) and Hashimoto Meiji (1904-1991).

044 A1387 橋本明治 秋意

Hashimoto Meiji, Maiko, Apprentice Geisha, in Autumn, Color on Paper, Shōwa Period, 1976, Yamatane Museum of Art

In addition to paintings, we’ll view beautiful woodblock prints, including examples by famous artists such as Kitagawa Utamaro as well as an exceptional group of prints that have never before been publicly displayed. Borrowed especially for this exhibition, this private collection includes prints from Thirty-Two Aspects of Customs and Manners, one of Tsukioka Yoshitoshi’s true masterpieces.

058 A0567 喜多川歌麿 青楼七小町 鶴屋内 篠原.jpg

Kitagawa Utamaro, Seven Beauties of the Gay Quarters: Shinohara of the Tsuruya, Large Format (Ōban) Polychrome Woodblock Print (Nishiki-e) on Paper, Edo Period, c. 1794-95, Yamatane Museum of Art.  (On display 8/29-9/24)

If you’ve been on my museum tours before, you know they are lively and informal. I try to keep keep things accessible for total beginners while offering new information and insights for those who may be already deep into the subject matter. Most of the paintings we’ll see are Nihonga so I’ll be sure to offer some helpful background on this category of Japanese painting. The tour is during regular museum hours, so we’ll be using headsets connected wirelessly to my microphone. This should allow everyone to hear well without our talk disturbing other visitors.

This tour is limited to 25 people (the number of headsets available). UPDATE: Tour filled the first day, but if you’re interested in going on a wait list, please let me know either through the contact page on this blog or by sending an email to gordenkeralice(at)gmail.com.

The Yamatane Museum of Art is located at 3-12-36 Hiroo, Shibuya-ku, and is about a 10 minute walk from Ebisu Station (use the West Exit if you’re coming on JR; Exit 2 if you’re coming on the Hibiya subway line). There is a map and directions on the museum’s website or use this link to Google Maps.

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Ticket Giveaway: Flower exhibition at the Yamatane Museum

023 A0722ü@żù╤î├îaü@öÆë╪żï╫.jpg

Kobayashi Kokei, Bird and Everygreen Magnolia (1935), color on silk, Yamatane Museum of Art

By special arrangement with the Yamatane Museum of Art, one of my favorite museums, I have 5 pairs of tickets to give away. The tickets are for their current A World of Flowers – from the Rinpa School to Contemporary Art.

20170424_175014

A view of the main gallery. There are approximately 60 wonderful flower paintings on exhibit.

Please enter by sending me your name, email address and mailing address via the contact form on this blog.  If I get more than five applicants, I’ll have my computer do a random drawing.  Your information won’t be used for any other purpose.

004 A1218ü@ë£æ║ôyïìü@æτîφ

One of the most beloved paintings in the museum’s collection: Cherry Blossoms at Daigo-ji Temple (1972) by Okamura Togyu. Color on paper. Image courtesy of Yamatane Museum of Art. It’s something else to see in person, trust me.

Let’s limit to this to residents of Japan or people with an address in Japan, and to be fair to others, please enter only if you’ve got a reasonable chance of using the tickets. The exhibition runs through June 18. I’ll accept entries through May 6, and the museum will mail out tickets early in the week of May 8.

20170424_182335

For every exhibition, the museum commissions five special wagashi sweets, each inspired by one of the works on display. Enjoy them in the cafe with tea, or take them home.

20170424_174358

The museum shop is a good source for gifts that are very Japanese. You don’t have to pay admission to visit the shop, which is downstairs next to the main gallery; just tell the staff that you want to take a look at the shop.

Posted in Life in Japan | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

(FULL)Museum tour in English: Kakiemon exhibit at the Toguri Museum of Art (Wed. May 10, 7-8:30 pm)

Kakiemon_cherryblossom

A splendid and very large new work by Kakiemon XV: this covered jar with cherry blossom design (2017)

(Update: April 27: This event is now full. ) The Harvard Club of Japan has graciously allowed me to offer my contacts a few places in a private tour I am doing for them on Wednesday May 10 at 7 pm at the Toguri Museum of Art, a very nice small museum in Shoto, near Shibuya Station, that specializes in fine Japanese porcelain. This time, we will be enjoying a special exhibition of porcelain in the Kakiemon style. It will be my only tour for this exhibition, and the last at this museum until at least next fall, so if you’ve been wanting to join one of my tours, please grab this chance — there are only a few places available.

K-121224

This octagonal dish with a “Hob-in-the-Well” design is a typical example of the Kakiemon style, from the second half of the 17th century during the Edo period.

Details on the tour are here. To sign up, please contact Jonathan Harlow (Harvard Club Director of Events) for at jonathan@jonathanharlow.com

For more information on the exhibition, see my article in the Japan Times.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Watch the time! Thursday at 4, Friday at 6

In my original post about my gallery talks this week at the Tokyo Photographic Art Museum, I forgot to insert the time for the talk on Friday, which begins at 6 pm.  That information is now in the original post, but for the benefit of those who get notices of new posts by email, and may not see post updates,  I’m making a fresh post that will generate an email notice of the correct time information. Hope to see you!

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Museum tours in English: early Japanese photography (Thurs. April 13 and Fri. April 14)

244_toyoko (2)

Ambrotype portrait of Toyoko, wife of Matsudaira Tadanari, Yamanouchi Studio, c. 1868-1882.

Please join me this week, at the Tokyo Photographic Art Museum in Ebisu Garden Place, on Thursday April 13 at 4 pm or Friday April 14, 2017 at 6 pm, when I’ll give guided tours in English of  the exhibition, Dawn of Japanese Photography: The Anthology.  The tours are free with regular museum admission (700 yen for adults, less if you’re a student or over 60) and open to everyone without reservations.

Img27752 (2)

Some of the photographs are exhibited in freestanding cases so you can see both front and back. It’s important to view photographs as objects as well as images!

The exhibition presents the highlights and latest findings of a ten-year project to survey and catalog holdings of early Japanese photographs in museums, libraries and schools throughout Japan. Our understanding of the history of early photography in Japan is constantly expanding and being updated — this project turned up many previously unknown yet very important works, which we’ve brought together so you can see and learn.

8_tanaka (1)

Daguerreotype portrait of Tanaka Mitsuyoshi taken in 1854 by Eliphalet M. Brown Jr., official photographer to Commodore Perry.  Private collection.

If you’ve been on my museum tours before, you know they are lively and informal. I try to keep keep things accessible for total beginners while offering new information and insights for those who may be already deep into the subject matter. There are lots of interesting “firsts” to see in this exhibition, including the first photographs taken of a Japanese person as well as the first photographs taken by a Japanese person. (Quiz question: do you think these “firsts” were taken on Japanese soil or overseas?)

346_asuka shrine (1)

Albumen print showing damage to a shrine caused by the Shonai earthquake of 1894. Photographer unknown. Collection of the Homma Museum of Art in Sakata, Yamagata Prefecture.

You don’t need to contact me to get a space; just turn up! Each tour will last 50-60 minutes, but it’s fine to leave earlier if you’re pressed for time. Thursday’s tour is likely to be less crowded than Friday, just because of the time. The Tokyo Photographic Art Museum  — yes, this is the same museum that used to be called the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography — is about a 10-minute walk from JR Ebisu Station (through the covered SkyWalk walkway) and about 12-minutes from Ebisu station on the Hibiya subway line.  We will assemble in the third-floor lobby outside the exhibition.

Posted in Uncategorized | 3 Comments